4 programmers explain why they wouldn’t miss the BSM summit in New York

0

There are all sorts of reasons people come to BSM Summit. Usually your reason has a lot to do with your position in the industry.

Are you an aerial talent on the rise? You probably just networked with PDs and GMs. Are you a Market Leader? You’ve probably come looking for feasible and money-making ideas that you can execute at home.

A large part of the room will be made up of programmers. Why are they coming to BSM Summit? There are a myriad of reasons among this group alone.

I spoke with four programmers last week. All four will not only be in public in New York on March 2 and 3. At various times, they will also be on stage.

What do they want to learn? What do they expect their colleagues to learn from them? Who do they want to meet? Here’s how they answered those questions.

WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST AT PAST BSM SUMMITS?

Rod Lakin (94 WIP in Philadelphia): My favorite thing about the Summit is reconnecting with my peers and having the opportunity to meet other program directors and brand managers from across the country. Every market is different, but many generalizable lessons emerge from these sessions and the conversations that followed.

Phil Mackey (SKOR North in Minneapolis): I love sharing ideas and I love meeting successful people within the industry. Personally, I’m extremely curious by nature, so having the chance to hear from people with different backgrounds, worldviews, and industry experiences is extremely valuable. And the openness of competitors to sharing their strategy in the same room is also fascinating and valuable.

Mitch Rosen (670 The Score in Chicago, 1250 The Fan in Milwaukee and the BetQL audio network): The summit was a great place to network with peers and talk to people about the business, it’s also a great place to reconnect with people. I really appreciate the terrific range of speakers.

Dave Tepper (Altitude Sports Radio 92.5): Hear and meet other programmers. There are so many ups and downs in this industry, it’s refreshing to hear how some of the best in the business are doing. I still have notes from past summits which are useful. I also love hearing from some of the best local and national talent and talking about their journey. Jim Rome talking about selling the vacuum cleaner door to door or something while chasing his dream stayed with me and shared with the hosts to keep going.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR PROGRAMMERS TO TALK AND HEAR FROM OTHER PROGRAMMERS TO MOVE THE FORMAT AHEAD?

Lakine: There has never been a tougher time in a content business. Attention span decreases while content choices increase. So you really have more competition for less time. Finding new strategies to adapt to this new paradigm is what is most important to hear to move the sports talk format forward.

Macky: The two-day mental download of information from various people in the industry helps speed up the learning and growth process. The Summit usually turns out to be quite a collaborative event, even if the collaboration is unintentional.

Tipper: It’s really what we each make of it. It’s important to me because I always strive to be better and learn. Some programmers have accomplished things with their stations that our team is aiming for. Hearing them can be motivating and instructive. Some programmers are in similar situations to our group, so discussions may be relevant. Not everything said is applicable to all situations, but if you listen with an open mind, you’ll likely find something to take away from each.

WHO DO YOU EXPECT TO LEARN THIS YEAR?

Lakine: It’s hard to say until I get the information. I will say that I have never rubbed shoulders with Bruce Gilbert and that I took nothing away from the conversation. Spike Eskin is the best young mind in this industry and I really appreciated his perspective at the last summit.

Macky: Every time I hear John Skipper speak, I learn something from him. He has incredible leadership experience on both the traditional and digital sides of the industry, and I’m curious to hear his vision for where sports content is heading.

Pink : Beyond the programmers, I love the panels that Jason puts together beyond traditional sports radio. I’m really looking forward to seeing leaders in all industries

Tipper: Craig Carton. There is so much to hear about his journey. I have always appreciated talents with strong personalities, creativity and a willingness to push the limits. As listener sensitivity grows, I believe an appetite for talent like him will remain and I want to be part of his development within the confines of today. Learning that he got himself another shot and the perseverance he and WFAN had for him along the way is something I hope to learn from.

DO YOU HAVE NERVES ABOUT BEING ON STAGE? WHAT DO YOU HOPE THE AUDIENCE TAKES AWAY FROM YOUR PRESENTATION?

Lakine: I don’t really think about it until I’m up there. I just hope I can help someone in the audience the same way so many of these great sports minds have helped me at previous BSM summits and conferences over the years.

Macky: I’m actually thinking of turning my session into a 45-minute rant about why Kirk Cousins’ hollow stats don’t correlate with team success, but other than that, I hope the audience will learn something about how to build audiences in digital spaces.

Tipper: Sure. I’m experienced and comfortable on stage, but even some of the greatest performers have noted that nervousness is a sign that you care about what you’re about to do. Being invited to participate in any panel is humbling among peers. My hope would be to do for others what previous panels have done for me, be relatable as many of us are looking for similar goals. My hope is to encourage others who may be facing similar challenges, to provide fruitful ideas or perspectives to take ownership of, and eventually steer them away from the DON’Ts that I may have learned at the time. hard.

There are in-person and virtual ticket options for this year’s BSM Summit. Click on here to buy yours!

Share.

Comments are closed.